Information about the music
Mark Craig’s son, Tim, began composing at an early age and has since produced 5 CDs of his own music. Inspired by this creativity, Mark, himself, began composing and arranging, writing hymns and setting psalms to music. For over 3 years, Mark, Tim and sister Danielle have been leading these psalms for the St Joseph’s congregation. All the music described here is available to download from the Music page.
Mark and Tim’s compositions Come and See Mark Craig, 2008 Mark wrote Come and See primarily as a hymn for Advent but the hymn is also appropriate for Lent and indeed relevant for any time in the liturgical calendar. Come and see, now it’s time to rise, time to open up your eyes! Enjoy this lively studio recording. Lord May the Spirit Mark Craig, 2010 Initially, Mark composed a 4-part harmony around a mediaeval melody, only later writing the words to fit the music. Lord May the Spirit was first sung in Douai Abbey for the West Berkshire Pastoral Area confirmation Mass in 2010. The version here is a studio recording with Danielle as soloist. Risen Christ Tim Craig, 2002 Composed by Tim when he was 11 and sung here in a priceless live recording by 14-year old Tim. Tim has produced 5 CDs of his own compositions and inspired his dad, Mark, to take up composing. Telling God’s Story Music: Mark Craig, 2005 Lyrics: Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley, St Martin in the Fields, Trafalgar Square, London Mark submitted the composition as an entry in the BBC Radio 4 Christmas carol competition of 2005 and also as an assessment for his Music A’level. The entry did not win the Radio 4 competition but Mark did gain an A for his A’level! Telling God’s Story has been performed several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Terri Brown singing the solo part. Mark would like to acknowledge Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley for writing the lyrics and to thank them for allowing the song to appear on the St Joseph’s Music Group Website. 10% of any proceeds from downloading Telling God’s Story will support the church of St Martin in the Fields. The Mass of St Joseph Mark Craig, 2008/9 with revisions in 2012 and 2013 for the liturgy changes We have a studio recording of the original Gloria and live versions of the other hymns and the liturgically revised Gloria. The Newbury Mass Mark Craig, 2003/4 The first Mass written by Mark between 2003 and 2004 and revised in 2012 for the new Catholic liturgy. Mark had been to school at St Bart’s in Newbury between 1973 and 1977, and returned to Newbury with his family in 1998 following the death of his father. His mother, and best-selling author, Mary Craig (www.voicesfromsilence.com), lives in Penwood, Newbury with Mark’s two brothers, Anthony and Nick.
Traditional hymns Alleluia Freuet Hammerschmidt, 1646 The original melody of Freuet euch ihr Christen alle first appeared in print in Andreas Hammerschmidt’s “Vierter Theill Musicalischer Andachten” in 1646, where it included an Alleluia section, performed here, before the first verse and again after the last verse. The melody was later incorporated into a chorale (BWV 40) by J S Bach. Ave Maria Anonymous, arranged Mark Craig, 2009 Mark first sang this haunting setting of Ave Maria as a 10-year old school boy at Donhead, Wimbledon. Despite extensive research, he does not know who composed it, so if anyone recognises it or knows the composer, please let Mark know! In 2009, Mark spent many hours transcribing it from a scratchy old 1969 recording of the Donhead choir playing at a wedding, and it has since been sung several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Danielle taking the solo part. It is Mark’s favourite setting of this traditional prayer which incorporates two passages from St Luke’s gospel: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee”, and “Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb”. In mid-13th century Western Europe, the prayer consisted of only these words with the single addition of the name “Mary” after the word “Hail”. Amazing Grace A Christian hymn published in 1779 with words by English poet and clergyman, John Newton, 1725-1807 Newton was involved in the slave trade until he underwent conversion following a violent storm which battered his vessel off the Irish coast. Amazing Grace is now one of the most widely sung African American spiritual songs. Rehearsal time for our music group is limited by our busy lives and, routinely, the only time we have for group rehearsal is before Sunday Mass. Have a listen to this recording of us rehearsing Amazing Grace. Forty Days and Forty Nights Melody from Nürnbergisches Gesangbuch, 1676, possibly by M Herbst, 1654-1681 Widely sung during lent. Gaudete Gaudete is believed to form part of Piae Cantiones, derived from the Bohemian song, Ezecheelis Porta published in 1582. The melody adopted here is that recorded by Steeleye Span in 1972. The verse melody differs markedly from the original Piae Cantiones version but the refrain is the same. In this recording, our music group form part of the Academy of the Combined Churches of Newbury, formed for a special Christmas concert in December 2009 in St Joseph’s Church and co-directed by Stephen Spain and Mark Craig. God is Love, His the Care Melody of Personent Hodie from Piae Cantiones, 1582. Arranged by Gustav Holst, 1874-1934 and here by Mark Craig Hail Queen of Heaven Traditional, harmony by HF Hemy, 1818-1888 Immortal Invisible Adapted from a Welsh melody in John Roberts’ Caniadau y Cyssegr, 1839 Let all Mortal Flesh Traditional French carol possibly written in the 17th century, and found in Tiersot’s Mélodies, Paris 1887 Magnificat The Magnificat/Canticle of Mary (from Luke 1) is set here to the music of the Scottish folk song, Go lassie go. It was published in Songs of the Spirit in 1978. O Come, o Come Emmanuel Melody adapted from a French missal by Thomas Helmore, 1811-1890 Silent Night Franz Grüber, 1787-1863 Sing Hosanna A great foot-tapping traditional hymn! We Three Kings of Orient Are John Henry Hopkins, 1822-1900 Ye Sons and Daughters of the Lord Melody from Airs sur les hymns sacrez, odes et noёls, Paris, 1623 as given in Samuel Webbe’s Collection of Motetts or Antiphons, 1792 Arranged here by Mark Craig A haunting piece, we often sing the first verse and Alleluia refrain as the Gospel Acclamation during Easter.
Site Navigation
External Sites
Copyright  2018 St Joseph’s Church Music Group
Website designed and created by
Tim Craig
Information about the music
Mark Craig’s son, Tim, began composing at an early age and has since produced 5 CDs of his own music. Inspired by this creativity, Mark, himself, began composing and arranging, writing hymns and setting psalms to music. For over 3 years, Mark, Tim and sister Danielle have been leading these psalms for the St Joseph’s congregation. All the music described here is available to download from the Music page.
Mark and Tim’s compositions Come and See Mark Craig, 2008 Mark wrote Come and See primarily as a hymn for Advent but the hymn is also appropriate for Lent and indeed relevant for any time in the liturgical calendar. Come and see, now it’s time to rise, time to open up your eyes! Enjoy this lively studio recording. Lord May the Spirit Mark Craig, 2010 Initially, Mark composed a 4-part harmony around a mediaeval melody, only later writing the words to fit the music. Lord May the Spirit was first sung in Douai Abbey for the West Berkshire Pastoral Area confirmation Mass in 2010. The version here is a studio recording with Danielle as soloist. Risen Christ Tim Craig, 2002 Composed by Tim when he was 11 and sung here in a priceless live recording by 14-year old Tim. Tim has produced 5 CDs of his own compositions and inspired his dad, Mark, to take up composing. Telling God’s Story Music: Mark Craig, 2005 Lyrics: Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley, St Martin in the Fields, Trafalgar Square, London Mark submitted the composition as an entry in the BBC Radio 4 Christmas carol competition of 2005 and also as an assessment for his Music A’level. The entry did not win the Radio 4 competition but Mark did gain an A for his A’level! Telling God’s Story has been performed several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Terri Brown singing the solo part. Mark would like to acknowledge Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley for writing the lyrics and to thank them for allowing the song to appear on the St Joseph’s Music Group Website. 10% of any proceeds from downloading Telling God’s Story will support the church of St Martin in the Fields. The Mass of St Joseph Mark Craig, 2008/9 with revisions in 2012 and 2013 for the liturgy changes We have a studio recording of the original Gloria and live versions of the other hymns and the liturgically revised Gloria. The Newbury Mass Mark Craig, 2003/4 The first Mass written by Mark between 2003 and 2004 and revised in 2012 for the new Catholic liturgy. Mark had been to school at St Bart’s in Newbury between 1973 and 1977, and returned to Newbury with his family in 1998 following the death of his father. His mother, and best-selling author, Mary Craig (www.voicesfromsilence.com), lives in Penwood, Newbury with Mark’s two brothers, Anthony and Nick.
Traditional hymns Alleluia Freuet Hammerschmidt, 1646 The original melody of Freuet euch ihr Christen alle first appeared in print in Andreas Hammerschmidt’s “Vierter Theill Musicalischer Andachten” in 1646, where it included an Alleluia section, performed here, before the first verse and again after the last verse. The melody was later incorporated into a chorale (BWV 40) by J S Bach. Ave Maria Anonymous, arranged Mark Craig, 2009 Mark first sang this haunting setting of Ave Maria as a 10-year old school boy at Donhead, Wimbledon. Despite extensive research, he does not know who composed it, so if anyone recognises it or knows the composer, please let Mark know! In 2009, Mark spent many hours transcribing it from a scratchy old 1969 recording of the Donhead choir playing at a wedding, and it has since been sung several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Danielle taking the solo part. It is Mark’s favourite setting of this traditional prayer which incorporates two passages from St Luke’s gospel: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee”, and “Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb”. In mid-13th century Western Europe, the prayer consisted of only these words with the single addition of the name “Mary” after the word “Hail”. Amazing Grace A Christian hymn published in 1779 with words by English poet and clergyman, John Newton, 1725-1807 Newton was involved in the slave trade until he underwent conversion following a violent storm which battered his vessel off the Irish coast. Amazing Grace is now one of the most widely sung African American spiritual songs. Rehearsal time for our music group is limited by our busy lives and, routinely, the only time we have for group rehearsal is before Sunday Mass. Have a listen to this recording of us rehearsing Amazing Grace. Forty Days and Forty Nights Melody from Nürnbergisches Gesangbuch, 1676, possibly by M Herbst, 1654-1681 Widely sung during lent. Gaudete Gaudete is believed to form part of Piae Cantiones, derived from the Bohemian song, Ezecheelis Porta published in 1582. The melody adopted here is that recorded by Steeleye Span in 1972. The verse melody differs markedly from the original Piae Cantiones version but the refrain is the same. In this recording, our music group form part of the Academy of the Combined Churches of Newbury, formed for a special Christmas concert in December 2009 in St Joseph’s Church and co-directed by Stephen Spain and Mark Craig. God is Love, His the Care Melody of Personent Hodie from Piae Cantiones, 1582. Arranged by Gustav Holst, 1874-1934 and here by Mark Craig Hail Queen of Heaven Traditional, harmony by HF Hemy, 1818-1888 Immortal Invisible Adapted from a Welsh melody in John Roberts’ Caniadau y Cyssegr, 1839 Let all Mortal Flesh Traditional French carol possibly written in the 17th century, and found in Tiersot’s Mélodies, Paris 1887 Magnificat The Magnificat/Canticle of Mary (from Luke 1) is set here to the music of the Scottish folk song, Go lassie go. It was published in Songs of the Spirit in 1978. O Come, o Come Emmanuel Melody adapted from a French missal by Thomas Helmore, 1811- 1890 Silent Night Franz Grüber, 1787-1863 Sing Hosanna A great foot-tapping traditional hymn! We Three Kings of Orient Are John Henry Hopkins, 1822-1900 Ye Sons and Daughters of the Lord Melody from Airs sur les hymns sacrez, odes et noёls, Paris, 1623 as given in Samuel Webbe’s Collection of Motetts or Antiphons, 1792 Arranged here by Mark Craig A haunting piece, we often sing the first verse and Alleluia refrain as the Gospel Acclamation during Easter.
Site Navigation
External Sites
Copyright  2018 St Joseph’s Church Music Group
Website designed and created by
Tim Craig
Information about the music
Mark Craig’s son, Tim, began composing at an early age and has since produced 5 CDs of his own music. Inspired by this creativity, Mark, himself, began composing and arranging, writing hymns and setting psalms to music. For over 3 years, Mark, Tim and sister Danielle have been leading these psalms for the St Joseph’s congregation. All the music described here is available to download from the Music page.
Mark and Tim’s compositions Come and See Mark Craig, 2008 Mark wrote Come and See primarily as a hymn for Advent but the hymn is also appropriate for Lent and indeed relevant for any time in the liturgical calendar. Come and see, now it’s time to rise, time to open up your eyes! Enjoy this lively studio recording. Lord May the Spirit Mark Craig, 2010 Initially, Mark composed a 4-part harmony around a mediaeval melody, only later writing the words to fit the music. Lord May the Spirit was first sung in Douai Abbey for the West Berkshire Pastoral Area confirmation Mass in 2010. The version here is a studio recording with Danielle as soloist. Risen Christ Tim Craig, 2002 Composed by Tim when he was 11 and sung here in a priceless live recording by 14-year old Tim. Tim has produced 5 CDs of his own compositions and inspired his dad, Mark, to take up composing. Telling God’s Story Music: Mark Craig, 2005 Lyrics: Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley, St Martin in the Fields, Trafalgar Square, London Mark submitted the composition as an entry in the BBC Radio 4 Christmas carol competition of 2005 and also as an assessment for his Music A’level. The entry did not win the Radio 4 competition but Mark did gain an A for his A’level! Telling God’s Story has been performed several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Terri Brown singing the solo part. Mark would like to acknowledge Liz Griffiths and Rosemary Lain Priestley for writing the lyrics and to thank them for allowing the song to appear on the St Joseph’s Music Group Website. 10% of any proceeds from downloading Telling God’s Story will support the church of St Martin in the Fields. The Mass of St Joseph Mark Craig, 2008/9 with revisions in 2012 and 2013 for the liturgy changes We have a studio recording of the original Gloria and live versions of the other hymns and the liturgically revised Gloria. The Newbury Mass Mark Craig, 2003/4 The first Mass written by Mark between 2003 and 2004 and revised in 2012 for the new Catholic liturgy. Mark had been to school at St Bart’s in Newbury between 1973 and 1977, and returned to Newbury with his family in 1998 following the death of his father. His mother, and best-selling author, Mary Craig (www.voicesfromsilence.com), lives in Penwood, Newbury with Mark’s two brothers, Anthony and Nick.
Traditional hymns Alleluia Freuet Hammerschmidt, 1646 The original melody of Freuet euch ihr Christen alle first appeared in print in Andreas Hammerschmidt’s “Vierter Theill Musicalischer Andachten” in 1646, where it included an Alleluia section, performed here, before the first verse and again after the last verse. The melody was later incorporated into a chorale (BWV 40) by J S Bach. Ave Maria Anonymous, arranged Mark Craig, 2009 Mark first sang this haunting setting of Ave Maria as a 10-year old school boy at Donhead, Wimbledon. Despite extensive research, he does not know who composed it, so if anyone recognises it or knows the composer, please let Mark know! In 2009, Mark spent many hours transcribing it from a scratchy old 1969 recording of the Donhead choir playing at a wedding, and it has since been sung several times by the St Joseph’s Music Group with Danielle taking the solo part. It is Mark’s favourite setting of this traditional prayer which incorporates two passages from St Luke’s gospel: “Hail, full of grace, the Lord is with thee”, and “Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb”. In mid- 13th century Western Europe, the prayer consisted of only these words with the single addition of the name “Mary” after the word “Hail”. Amazing Grace A Christian hymn published in 1779 with words by English poet and clergyman, John Newton, 1725-1807 Newton was involved in the slave trade until he underwent conversion following a violent storm which battered his vessel off the Irish coast. Amazing Grace is now one of the most widely sung African American spiritual songs. Rehearsal time for our music group is limited by our busy lives and, routinely, the only time we have for group rehearsal is before Sunday Mass. Have a listen to this recording of us rehearsing Amazing Grace. Forty Days and Forty Nights Melody from Nürnbergisches Gesangbuch, 1676, possibly by M Herbst, 1654-1681 Widely sung during lent. Gaudete Gaudete is believed to form part of Piae Cantiones, derived from the Bohemian song, Ezecheelis Porta published in 1582. The melody adopted here is that recorded by Steeleye Span in 1972. The verse melody differs markedly from the original Piae Cantiones version but the refrain is the same. In this recording, our music group form part of the Academy of the Combined Churches of Newbury, formed for a special Christmas concert in December 2009 in St Joseph’s Church and co-directed by Stephen Spain and Mark Craig. God is Love, His the Care Melody of Personent Hodie from Piae Cantiones, 1582. Arranged by Gustav Holst, 1874-1934 and here by Mark Craig Hail Queen of Heaven Traditional, harmony by HF Hemy, 1818-1888 Immortal Invisible Adapted from a Welsh melody in John Roberts’ Caniadau y Cyssegr, 1839 Let all Mortal Flesh Traditional French carol possibly written in the 17th century, and found in Tiersot’s Mélodies, Paris 1887 Magnificat The Magnificat/Canticle of Mary (from Luke 1) is set here to the music of the Scottish folk song, Go lassie go. It was published in Songs of the Spirit in 1978. O Come, o Come Emmanuel Melody adapted from a French missal by Thomas Helmore, 1811-1890 Silent Night Franz Grüber, 1787-1863 Sing Hosanna A great foot-tapping traditional hymn! We Three Kings of Orient Are John Henry Hopkins, 1822-1900 Ye Sons and Daughters of the Lord Melody from Airs sur les hymns sacrez, odes et noёls, Paris, 1623 as given in Samuel Webbe’s Collection of Motetts or Antiphons, 1792 Arranged here by Mark Craig A haunting piece, we often sing the first verse and Alleluia refrain as the Gospel Acclamation during Easter.
Site Navigation
External Sites
Copyright  2018 St Joseph’s Church Music Group
Website designed and created by
Tim Craig
St Joseph’s Church Music Group
St Joseph’s Church Music Group
St Joseph’s Church Music Group